Gait Recon XLU Lacrosse Head Preview

By Will Walker
ComLax Marketing Dept.
So the other night I got to test out the new Recon XLU and impressed me with how well it performed I was skeptical at first. But Gait has completely revamped their product lines to deliver equipment which provides advantages to the players with their “more than a game” strategy. What this means is that Gait isn’t going to put out a product just so that the can put something out on the market they are spending the time on R&D to figure out ways to actually help improve a players game while keeping up with techonological advances in the market. As for the Recon XLU here is what I thought about the head and how it performed for me.
Design:
 The sidewall design is the same as the XL with a narrow face for a great channel and amazing ball control. With this being a Universal head sometimes when companies “universalize” traditional heads they come out looking awkward but this looks great and feels great as well.The vertical design in the sidewall was strategically placed for strength and the ability to snap back into place and not warp the head. Multiple stringing holes allow for any pocket type to be strung up so you can string it just the way you want to.
Stiffness:
I used it as a LSM to really put a test to the strength of the sidewalls and it truly impressed me and it performed great for me holding its shape. But on faceoffs it had the ability to plunge very easily and pop the ball easily without it being too flimsy or too stiff it was goldilocks JUST RIGHT! On poke checks it seems to hold it shape enough to land a solid check. On ground balls the moderate scoop allows players to easy grab ground balls so they can land in the pocket quickly and easily. On poke checks it seems to hold it shape enough to land a solid check.
Weight:
Off the bat this head is real lightweight and offers a great balanced feel throughout the head and at only 128 grams this will be one of the lightest heads on the market. This head is obviously for those attackmen and midfielder who are have mid/high pockets that are looking to rip the net apart.
Durability:
By only using it a couple times I can’t exactly say what the lifespan of the head is but the plastic is strong enough and sturdy enough to take a beating. The Recon XLU will perform the same way every time without having to worry about the head warping or breaking.
Overall I was very impressed with this head and I haven’t been impressed by a Gait head this much since the original Torque. But anyway this head is going to certainly make a huge jump in the NCAA community and I’m sure to see this on the field at UVA a lot throughout their midfield and attack core. Will come unstrung, strung with mesh or strung with traditional as well. Check back later to get this head when it comes out becuase we’re as excited as you are.

The Brine Cyber Is Back!

By Will Walker, ComLax Marketing

The Brine CYBER is back!!!! Once again Brine has brought back a head that was once very successful and updated it for 2013!
Brine updated this head for 2013 but stayed true to the heads roots which offers the same aggresive offset and styling to give you a head that will perform every time and be able to remain competitive. The Cyber is a defensemen’s dream head it light enough for easy mobility, strong enough to handle tons beatings and wide enough to get into any passing lane.
As the saying goes “defense wins championships” and Brine realized they needed to reinforce this idea into people’s heads by reinforcing the sidewalls of the Cyber to be able to put up with the rough play defenders are known for.The Cyber offers Brine’s strategic “Cross Beam Construction” which you can see reinforces the sidewall without being too aggresive and remaining lightweight.
Brine also redesigned the throat to reduce excess material and reinforced the connection to the shaft with two screw holes to reduce the rattling of loose heads.
The Cyber offers a wide enough face to allow any defender to get into the passing lanes and transition out of the defensive end. Also the shape helps to strengthen the head to help it remain sturdy.
As fans of the original Cyber we are really excited about this launch and look for these to be tearing up the defensive end.
If you’re in the market for a new head check them out here!!!!!

 


Warrior Rabil Lacrosse Head Launch

When Warrior and Paul Rabil sat down they set out to create the ultimate scoring machine and what we got was; THE RABIL, a head inspired by the BEST scorer in the game.

First he was a 2-time national champion with Johns Hopkins, selected 1st overall by the Boston Cannons in the 2008 MLL draft, 2011 MLL champion with the Cannons, 3-time offensive player of the year and 2-time MLL MVP.  Paul Rabil is with out a doubt one of the best players to EVER play the game and with that being said, he always wants to make sure he performs at his best.  In 2009 Rabil set the WORLD RECORD for fastest shot at 111 mph. With that in mind Warrior scooped up Rabil to join their design staff in 2012 and whether or not they hit the jackpot remains to be seen but we think they’ll do okay.
Rabil personally sat down with Warrior’s research and design team to fine tune and tweak areas specific to enhancing his shooting mechanics. During the R&D of this stick Warrior design managers wanted to capture shooting mechanics in real time so they could understand how sticks perform in different circumstances to get data on shooting mechanics work within stick construction. Here you can see a Warrior Evo 3 with a bunch of sensors on it.
At first glance of the head you can see the maximum offset with Warrior’s TruOffset technology to allow for a deeper pocket and smoother feel when stick handling.
The Rabil has a great universal pinch with the flared bottom sidewall so that everyone at any level can use it. The bottom sidewall also has a specifically designed curve to create a perfect and consistent release from the pocket on shots and passes.
The lightweight design is showcased with Warrior’s NOZ molding process with hollowed out sidewall which is injected with NOZ to create that lightweight feel yet add strength as well. Also there are a TON of sidewall holes so that all you string surgeons out there can get fancy and string this head up a million different ways.
Warrior also added their 2shot customizable molding process also allows for multiple colors to be injected into the head where the Rabil is available in 7 different color ways.
All in all we think that this head will be pretty amazing and this should be making its way to a ComLax near you and online within the next couple weeks, so stay tuned. ALL HAIL!!

Maverik Spider Lacrosse Head Review

Arachnophobics have no fear! The Maverik Spider doesn’t bite, that is unless it’s the back of the net.

What sets the Maverik Spider head apart from any other on the market right now is its design. Inspired by the combination of robotic spiders and the architecture of NYC’s famous bridges, the Maverik Spider merges the unique and intriguing anatomy of spiders with human technology. Maverik took a different approach to designing the Spider by adding support on the specific areas of the head that receive the most stress while in play. The cool thing about the Spider is its weight, which is surprisingly light when considering the amount of strength it has. When I first picked this head up, I was really surprised by its light weight. The Maverik Spider’s rail structure and specifically placed holes give it the unmatched weight and strength of a spider web.

After I had my first look at the head, I went on to stringing it. The unique feature on this head is the design of the sidewall holes. When you string a stick, the sidewall string is what pulls the mesh to the head and forms your pocket. The Spider essentially has slits placed in cooperation with its sidewall holes. This makes it easy to lock your sidewall into place and guarantee an even tightness on each side of the head.

For stringing, I used grey 10D Jimalax hard mesh. The grey hard mesh by Jimalax is pretty different than most other hard mesh. It is softer, which makes it easier to break in your pocket. I strung the mesh up with Jimalax Snow Camouflage sidewall string. I felt like the grey and camo together would truly give the head the look of a spider. After I was done stringing, I ended up with a surprisingly nice channel. Usually it is difficult to get a good channel with rounded heads with wide throats, but not with the Maverik Spider. I decided to put in a V for a shooter instead of a U in order to get optimal precision when throwing. Then I put in one straight shooter and a Snow Camo nylon, which really lets you feel the ball come out when you throw.

I’d recommend the Maverik Spider head to the offensive minded player. Whether you’re an attackman, middie, or pole who is a scoring threat, this head is great for putting the biscuit in the basket. I was sniping with this in the side yard and I was ripping holes in my net! The Spider is a great head engineered by some creative minds over at Maverik Lacrosse. Pics below – and you can get your own by clicking right here:


Nike CEO Lacrosse Head and Jimalax JimaWAX Mesh Review

By Chris Tomaselli, Commonwealth Lacrosse (Franklin, MA)

It is a well-known fact that lacrosse is the fastest growing game on two feet. Along with the publicity has come a flurry of trends and fads in style and gear. The newest up-and-coming gear trend is the use of waxed mesh. While waxed mesh has been available to the public for quite some time, it has only recently become a bit more popular.

Waxed mesh was initially used in indoor lacrosse; rather than use the mesh for its water resistant qualities, players used the wax grip to make up for the humidity lost from the outdoor game. As more and more players indoors began using it, it began to catch on in the MLL. Players of every position –even goalies– began giving waxed mesh a whirl. Fast forward to today, and waxed mesh is the new thing a few stores out there are carrying. At the moment, ComLax carries all Jimalax mesh, but not JimaWAX mesh. We are looking at and evaluating the potential for carrying it, but we’d love to hear how feel about it first.

I was able to get my hands on a sample and I can tell you a little bit about it here.

I had the opportunity to sample a piece of Carolina Blue JimaWAX mesh on the CEO, Nike’s top-of-the-line head. To be honest, I was really excited to test out both the mesh and the head. Waxed mesh is something I’ve never been able to get my hands on and the CEO is one of the top heads on the market designed for attackmen.

My first impressions of the mesh were its smell and texture. It smelled like wax; no chemicals, no dye, no fresheners….just wax. The JimaWAX mesh was also interesting because I expected it to be really stiff and hard to stretch out. It was actually the opposite – it took me three easy pulls for the mesh to be as stretched as I needed it to be to string. The only annoying part about stretching the mesh was the waxed flakes that fell onto my lap, but you have to give a little to get a little, so I can’t complain. I simply put a towel on my lap while I was stringing to avoid being covered in little pieces of wax.

With the technical stringing of the CEO, the head has unusual top string holes. There are eight holes total split in half by the part of the scoop displaying the Nike symbol. I strung up a regular 10D top string, but instead of stringing every other hole on the scoop, I had to do the 1st, 4th, 5th, and 8th holes due to their spacing. I also started the top string on the 2nd hole down on the sidewall in order to pull down the mesh. I started the sidewall stringing on the 3rd hole down, skipped a hole, and then double interlocked. This creates a good channel so that the ball releases out of the head on a straight route. The channel also affects the hold and whip of your head, so it is important to create a channel that suits your game. From the double interlock, I doubled up on the mesh once and then strung every other hole on the head until the 14th hole. From there I strung every hole the rest of the way down. I put in a tight bottom string and ended up with a mid pocket, perfect for a feeder from X.

At this point, you see where the JimaWAX mesh plays its part. The wax coated mesh has the distinct ability to memorize where you hold the ball in your stick and how you throw and shoot. Because of this, the pocket will reform and hold every time you get the ball in your stick. JimaWAX is also significantly lighter than any other weather resistant mesh. Waxed mesh is not fool proof, however. It does have the tendency of “bagging out.” This means that you need to make sure you keep your sidewalls and bottom string tight and shooters loose so that the mesh does not get too whippy. Since I chose to make a tight channel, I decided not to install a U or a V because the ball would get caught up before releasing. Instead, two straight shooters were put in just above where the ball sits in the pocket. To add on an extra lip when the ball releases from the head, I wove a nylon above the straighties.

Overall, this setup is ideal for an attackman who specializes in feeding. Lots of hold, smooth release, a fairly stiff head with a long throat, and very durable mesh are perfect for the position. In addition, I would recommend the JimaWAX mesh is perfect for any player of any skill or position from the cage to X. Its weather resistance and durability put it a notch ahead of any other type of mesh. JimaWAX gives you the grip and feel of traditional stringing, but also the same old reliability and hold of a mesh pocket.

…but what do YOU think? Have you used this stuff? What are your thoughts? Let’s hear it!