Warrior REVO 3 Review

Warrior Revo 3 Head

Warrior Revo 3 Review

The REVO 3 is the latest installment from Warrior in the Revolution line of lacrosse heads. In the past, the Revolutions weren’t exactly catered to defenders, but defenders usually used them more. For the REVO 3, Warrior has made it all about the DEFENSE. This head is designed to be stronger, stiffer and wider to allow the defense to own the offense.

In the past, the Revos didn’t have a good rep for being able to handle the everyday beatings that defenders give out. From personal experience, I love the Revo line of heads, but felt they were a little weak, especially the Revo Pro (I once went through three in a single season). With the new REVO 3, though, the Triple beam sidewall construction has multiple construction tough points to create the stiffest sidewall in Warrior’s head family. Good news.

Warrior also utilizes a wider face shape to give defenders better ability to pick off the ball in the passing lanes. As I mentioned before, I was a Revo Pro fanatic, but thought it was a little too pinched. The REVO 3 has a huge surface area to allow defenders to intercept the ball and transition up field.

Warrior also slightly tweaked the construction of the sidewall on the REVO 3 to allow for a better transition through the head and that will create a better feel for the ball, with a high pocket making it great for ground balls. In addition, Warrior added raised grip zones on the top rail of the head, which will grip onto opponents when throwing checks.

Check out MLL Pro Kyle Hartzell’s Review:

This head is going to be a huge player in the defensive game, so if you want to start your own REVOlution check out the new Warrior REVO 3 today!

 

 

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Maverik Spider Lacrosse Head Review

Arachnophobics have no fear! The Maverik Spider doesn’t bite, that is unless it’s the back of the net.

What sets the Maverik Spider head apart from any other on the market right now is its design. Inspired by the combination of robotic spiders and the architecture of NYC’s famous bridges, the Maverik Spider merges the unique and intriguing anatomy of spiders with human technology. Maverik took a different approach to designing the Spider by adding support on the specific areas of the head that receive the most stress while in play. The cool thing about the Spider is its weight, which is surprisingly light when considering the amount of strength it has. When I first picked this head up, I was really surprised by its light weight. The Maverik Spider’s rail structure and specifically placed holes give it the unmatched weight and strength of a spider web.

After I had my first look at the head, I went on to stringing it. The unique feature on this head is the design of the sidewall holes. When you string a stick, the sidewall string is what pulls the mesh to the head and forms your pocket. The Spider essentially has slits placed in cooperation with its sidewall holes. This makes it easy to lock your sidewall into place and guarantee an even tightness on each side of the head.

For stringing, I used grey 10D Jimalax hard mesh. The grey hard mesh by Jimalax is pretty different than most other hard mesh. It is softer, which makes it easier to break in your pocket. I strung the mesh up with Jimalax Snow Camouflage sidewall string. I felt like the grey and camo together would truly give the head the look of a spider. After I was done stringing, I ended up with a surprisingly nice channel. Usually it is difficult to get a good channel with rounded heads with wide throats, but not with the Maverik Spider. I decided to put in a V for a shooter instead of a U in order to get optimal precision when throwing. Then I put in one straight shooter and a Snow Camo nylon, which really lets you feel the ball come out when you throw.

I’d recommend the Maverik Spider head to the offensive minded player. Whether you’re an attackman, middie, or pole who is a scoring threat, this head is great for putting the biscuit in the basket. I was sniping with this in the side yard and I was ripping holes in my net! The Spider is a great head engineered by some creative minds over at Maverik Lacrosse. Pics below – and you can get your own by clicking right here:


Nike CEO Lacrosse Head and Jimalax JimaWAX Mesh Review

By Chris Tomaselli, Commonwealth Lacrosse (Franklin, MA)

It is a well-known fact that lacrosse is the fastest growing game on two feet. Along with the publicity has come a flurry of trends and fads in style and gear. The newest up-and-coming gear trend is the use of waxed mesh. While waxed mesh has been available to the public for quite some time, it has only recently become a bit more popular.

Waxed mesh was initially used in indoor lacrosse; rather than use the mesh for its water resistant qualities, players used the wax grip to make up for the humidity lost from the outdoor game. As more and more players indoors began using it, it began to catch on in the MLL. Players of every position –even goalies– began giving waxed mesh a whirl. Fast forward to today, and waxed mesh is the new thing a few stores out there are carrying. At the moment, ComLax carries all Jimalax mesh, but not JimaWAX mesh. We are looking at and evaluating the potential for carrying it, but we’d love to hear how feel about it first.

I was able to get my hands on a sample and I can tell you a little bit about it here.

I had the opportunity to sample a piece of Carolina Blue JimaWAX mesh on the CEO, Nike’s top-of-the-line head. To be honest, I was really excited to test out both the mesh and the head. Waxed mesh is something I’ve never been able to get my hands on and the CEO is one of the top heads on the market designed for attackmen.

My first impressions of the mesh were its smell and texture. It smelled like wax; no chemicals, no dye, no fresheners….just wax. The JimaWAX mesh was also interesting because I expected it to be really stiff and hard to stretch out. It was actually the opposite – it took me three easy pulls for the mesh to be as stretched as I needed it to be to string. The only annoying part about stretching the mesh was the waxed flakes that fell onto my lap, but you have to give a little to get a little, so I can’t complain. I simply put a towel on my lap while I was stringing to avoid being covered in little pieces of wax.

With the technical stringing of the CEO, the head has unusual top string holes. There are eight holes total split in half by the part of the scoop displaying the Nike symbol. I strung up a regular 10D top string, but instead of stringing every other hole on the scoop, I had to do the 1st, 4th, 5th, and 8th holes due to their spacing. I also started the top string on the 2nd hole down on the sidewall in order to pull down the mesh. I started the sidewall stringing on the 3rd hole down, skipped a hole, and then double interlocked. This creates a good channel so that the ball releases out of the head on a straight route. The channel also affects the hold and whip of your head, so it is important to create a channel that suits your game. From the double interlock, I doubled up on the mesh once and then strung every other hole on the head until the 14th hole. From there I strung every hole the rest of the way down. I put in a tight bottom string and ended up with a mid pocket, perfect for a feeder from X.

At this point, you see where the JimaWAX mesh plays its part. The wax coated mesh has the distinct ability to memorize where you hold the ball in your stick and how you throw and shoot. Because of this, the pocket will reform and hold every time you get the ball in your stick. JimaWAX is also significantly lighter than any other weather resistant mesh. Waxed mesh is not fool proof, however. It does have the tendency of “bagging out.” This means that you need to make sure you keep your sidewalls and bottom string tight and shooters loose so that the mesh does not get too whippy. Since I chose to make a tight channel, I decided not to install a U or a V because the ball would get caught up before releasing. Instead, two straight shooters were put in just above where the ball sits in the pocket. To add on an extra lip when the ball releases from the head, I wove a nylon above the straighties.

Overall, this setup is ideal for an attackman who specializes in feeding. Lots of hold, smooth release, a fairly stiff head with a long throat, and very durable mesh are perfect for the position. In addition, I would recommend the JimaWAX mesh is perfect for any player of any skill or position from the cage to X. Its weather resistance and durability put it a notch ahead of any other type of mesh. JimaWAX gives you the grip and feel of traditional stringing, but also the same old reliability and hold of a mesh pocket.

…but what do YOU think? Have you used this stuff? What are your thoughts? Let’s hear it!


STX X10 Lacrosse Head and Maverik Wonderboy Shaft Review

By Chris Tomaselli, Commonwealth Lacrosse, Franklin, MA

What’s up everyone? This is Chris Tomaselli, checking in here at the Commonwealth Lacrosse blog. I will be kicking things up a notch with a Game Time Review and this week, I will be featuring one of the best defensive stick set-ups out there – an STX X10 Head strung up with Jimalax white hard mesh, white sidewall, and white shooting strings on a black Maverik Wonderboy defense shaft.

Why is this one of the best defensive stick combinations available? The STX X10 is the head every defenseman from middle school to the pros is using. A defensive stick should be stiff to throw hard checks, hurt your opposition’s performance, and should not warp or flex when poke-checking or scooping. The X10’s rigid trestle sidewall design gives you the necessary strength and stiffness that a defensive stick should have. The X10 also has many sidewall options, which offer a number of diverse stringing patterns to any stick doctor. Compliant under NCAA and NFHS rules, the X10 has a wide throat which is ideal for a defensive head.

To start this bad boy off, I laced up the X10 with the California Dream Top String (a.k.a. the Triangle Top String). Despite its difficulty, the California Dream is gaining popularity because it is able to pull the mesh tighter to the scoop which significantly minimizes the lip. Plus, I think that the California Dream gives your head a sophisticated style unlike any other regular top string.

Next, I made sure that my sidewall knots were larger than usual because the top sidewall holes are larger on the X10 than on most other heads. From there, my stringing pattern went as follows: Skip a hole, in a hole, skip a hole, in a hole, double up on the mesh, and then string until the 2nd last hole where I tied it off.

After putting in my bottom string, I picked my shooting string pattern. I put in a U for ball control and then two straighties for a smooth release. Personally I like to feel the ball come out of the stick a little bit so I threw on a nylon too. I ended up with a smooth channel, perfect for handling ground balls and a sweet mid pocket which gives the head the ability for superb fakes and a quick release during clears.

On the other half of the set up, I have the Maverik Wonderboy defense shaft. The Wonderboy is probably one of the best overall shafts on the market. The name says it all — Wonderboy. The urban definition of this term is a low profile super hero. Keeping a low profile in lacrosse is what it’s all about. Not too flashy, but not unnoticed. The design is in fact a Wonderboy. It showcases the name in big bold letters that grab your attention, but not in a negative way. Like the name, the graphics are not too flashy, but not unnoticed.

The Wonderboy features an interesting grip pattern on the shaft. On defense, it is important to be able to slide your hands on the shaft to throw poke checks, but also to have the control to hold onto it when throwing other checks and handling the ball. The shaft’s raised grip is positioned on the sides of the shaft so you can hold onto the shaft when cradling. The smooth part is located on the top and bottom of the shaft’s exterior making it easier for your hands to slide up and down during poke checks. To top off the Wonderboy’s low profile is its alloy composition.  It is a blend of titanium and aluminum metals that give the Wonderboy a combination of strength, lightness, and durability.

Individually, the STX X10 head and the Maverik Wonderboy shaft are great pieces of lacrosse equipment. When combined, the X10 and Wonderboy are bad news to any lacrosse player who opposes their reign. Stop into your local ComLax store, or shop our righteous website and add these weapons to your game today.